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Step by step guide to minting your Git commit as an NFT

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How to turn your Git commits into an NFT a step by step guide [2022]

18 Jan, 2022 Β· 4 min read

This will be my first article around NFTs and anything related to Web3. Not because I'm not interested, but because it's all new to me.

If you found this article, it most likely means you are interested in it, so there is no need to discuss if it's good or wrong here.

By the end of this article, you will have converted a Git commit you made into an NFT! This NFT will define such memorable moments in a code project's history, which is exciting.

Think about GitHub's artic vault, a collection of remarkable contributions that will live on long after the code is gone.

And this is precisely what our NFT will do. Small note, it only works with public repos.

The one I made looks like this:

NFT of my commit

Or you can view it on OpenSea

Using MetaMask

Visit the MetaMask website and follow the install instructions for your browser.

After installing the extension, it automatically pops up on this landing page.

MetaMask landing page

Note: Take 5 minutes to play with this fox. It's adorable and follows your mouse around. 🦊

You will import an existing wallet or create a new one on the next screen.

If you have an existing one, you'll know what to do, so let's make a new one.

Make a new wallet

You'll have to agree to their terms and conditions, and in the step after that, you'll have to create a secure password. Preferably use a password manager for this.

Choose a secure password

The step will show you a video and the importance of the secret recovery phrase. Take good note of what is explained here. It's super important.

Note: Never share this secret phrase, and don't lose it! It's the only way to enter your wallet! πŸ†˜

Click the lock, and write down the phrase here. It's super important you write this down or save it in a super-secure location before going on.

Viewing the secret passphrase

On the screen after this one, you'll have to type the phrase by choosing from random words. Make sure this matches the phrase you just noted down.

MetaMask phrase

Once you fill out the phrase, click next, and you'll be done with the MetaMask setup.

MetaMask setup done

How to mint the commit NFT

Luckily for us, there is already a fantastic website that will do the heavy lifting.

So step one, go to the GitNFT website.

Visit the GitNFT website

Now you can press the Login button on the top right and login with your GitHub account.

Login to GitNFT

Once logged in, you can click on the "Suggest or Mint" button or view your recent commits by clicking "My commits".

Suggest or Mint a new NFT

Now head over to GitHub to find the commit you want to turn into an NFT. For me, it's the first commit for daily.dev, where I introduced the settings dropdown menu! 🀯

My first commit

Copy the URL, and paste it on the GitNFT website.

Getting the NFT

Once it's loaded, click the "Mint commit" button at the bottom.

This will automatically pop-up MetaMask to connect to GitNFT. You can click next there.

Allow GitNFT access to MetaMask

You can enter a description that can say something about the commit on the page itself. And you can toggle between Dark and Light mode.

Needless to say, I love dark mode πŸ–€

Once you are happy, click the "Mint commit" button.

Mint a GitHub commit

Once you click this button, it should pop up MetaMask again, where you're asked to sign the minting.

Sign the mint

It will then load for a couple of seconds and eventually redirect you to the minted NFT. (Have some patience here, it can take some time)

Once done, you'll see your NFT! You can also open it on OpenSea, and see the progress on EtherScan.

Git commit into NFT

And that's it! We turned a Git commit into an NFT.

Hoped you enjoyed it and looking forward to seeing some cool NFTs show up.

Thank you for reading, and let's connect!

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